DEFENCE, DEMOCRACY AND SOUTH AFRICA’S CIVIL-MILITARY GAP

Lindy Heinecken

Abstract


Civil-military relations theory suggests that a functional and effective military requires a unique culture, separate from its parent society. This is based on the assumption that a “gap” between the military and society is inevitable as the military’s function, the lawful application of military force in accordance with government direction, is fundamentally different from civilian business. Those interested in civil-military relations are essentially concerned with determining when the “gap” between the military and parent society becomes dysfunctional in terms of civil-control over the military and/or the military’s ability to execute its mandate. The correct balance needs to be obtained to ensure that the military remains strong enough to defend the state (protected by the military) and subservient enough not to threaten the state (protected from the military).



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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5787/33-1-6

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Copyright (c) 2018 Lindy Heinecken


ISSN 2224-0020 (online); ISSN 1022-8136 (print)

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