THE ANGLO-BOER WAR IN THE BORDERLANDS OF THE TRANSVAAL AND ZULULAND, 1899–1902

Johan Wassermann

Abstract


The low intensity warfare in the borderlands of the Transvaal and Zululand during the Anglo-Boer War is, despite lasting for the duration of the war, a neglected area in the historiography of the conflict. This article, which employs the conceptual framework of borderlands, attempts to address this. In doing so, the conflict, the way it transcended the geography of the region and the way it impacted on all the inhabitants of the area, are investigated. In the process, the nature of the conflict, which for the most part centred on the raiding of livestock in addition to attacks and raids on homesteads, farms, isolated shops and outlying military and government posts, is laid bare. The final outcome of the war in this area was the dismantling of the borderlands of the Transvaal and Zululand in favour of the Colony of Natal.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5787/39-2-111

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Copyright (c) 2018 Johan Wassermann


ISSN 2224-0020 (online); ISSN 1022-8136 (print)

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