SECURITISATION: THE CASE OF POST-9/11 UNITED STATES AFRICA POLICY

Robin E Walker, Annette Seegers

Abstract


In the wake of 9/11, Africa was securitised in a new way by the United States (US): weak states were believed to pose an existential threat to the US. American aid to Africa consequently more than tripled in the years following 9/11. Using the Copenhagen School's securitisation theory, we investigate the interaction between the executive branch as claimant and the US Congress as legitimiser. The factors of political agency and context are accentuated in our use of securitisation theory. Yet, the evidence also points to structural forces, especially the unequal relationship between executive and legislature.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.5787/40-2-995

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Copyright (c) 2018 Robin E Walker, Annette Seegers


ISSN 2224-0020 (online); ISSN 1022-8136 (print)

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